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Reference details

Author(s) Year Title Reference View/Download

Les Hatton , Greg Warr

2018g

CoHSI III: Long proteins and implications for protein evolution

https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.08614No downloadable files available yet

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Synopsis Invited Feedback Importance (/10, author rated :-) )
The length distribution of proteins measured in amino acids follows the CoHSI (Conservation of Hartley-Shannon Information) probability distribution. In previous papers we have verified various predictions of this using the Uniprot database but here we explore a novel predicted relationship between the longest proteins and evolutionary time. We demonstrate from both theory and experiment that the longest protein and the total number of proteins are intimately related by Information Theory and we give a simple formula for this. We stress that no evolutionary explanation is necessary; it is an intrinsic property of a CoHSI system. While the CoHSI distribution favors the appearance of proteins with fewer than 750 amino acids (characteristic of most functional proteins or their constituent domains) its intrinsic asymptotic power-law also favors the appearance of unusually long proteins; we predict that there are as yet undiscovered proteins longer than 45,000 amino acids. In so doing, we draw an analogy between the process of protein folding driven by favorable pathways (or funnels) through the energy landscape of protein conformations, and the preferential information pathways through which CoHSI exerts its constraints in discrete systems. Finally, we show that CoHSI predicts the recent appearance in evolutionary time of the longest proteins, specifically in eukaryotes because of their richer unique alphabet of amino acids, and by merging with independent phylogenetic data, we confirm a predicted consistent relationship between the longest proteins and documented and potential undocumented mass extinctions. None yet9

Related links

Related papers and links

https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.08614


Auto-generated: $Revision: 1.62 $, $Date: 2019/04/24 13:59:08 $, Copyright Les Hatton 2001-